SALE! Limited Time Promotion Ends July 31

Each week I offer up to three Limited Time Promotions, which run for just five days. This week’s Limited Time Promotions include a trio of photos from the streets of San Francisco. Subscribe to my blog at the bottom of this page, or on the Contact page, so you won’t miss announcements about these special deals. This week’s promotions end July 31.

Limited Time Promotion

This week’s first Limited Time Promotion is an 11×14-inch gallery-wrapped canvas print of Marian And Vivian Brown. I’m offering this canvas print through Fine Art America, a company renown for their museum-quality prints. Fine Art America has fulfillment centers in the United States, Canada, Europe, Australia, and the United Kingdom. The image is printed on canvas and mounted on an 11x14x1.5-inch stretcher frame–ready to hang on your wall. With proper care this canvas print should retain its beautiful appearance for at least 75 years.

Regular price $131
SALE price $59

This promotion ends on July 31. Click for details.

Black and white photo of the famous Brown twins in San Francisco.

 

Limited Time Promotion

The second Limited Time Promotion is an 11×14-inch gallery-wrapped canvas print of Big Hair. I’m offering this canvas print through Fine Art America, a company renown for their museum-quality prints. Fine Art America has fulfillment centers in the United States, Canada, Europe, Australia, and the United Kingdom. The image is printed on canvas and mounted on an 11×14-1.5-inch stretcher frame–ready to hang on your wall. With proper care this canvas print should retain its beautiful appearance for at least 75 years.

Regular price $131
SALE price $59

This promotion ends on July 31. Click for details.

Black and white photo of a female impersonator with huge blonde hair and a diamond necklace.

 

Limited Time Promotion

Last, but not least, is an 11×14-inch gallery-wrapped canvas print of Butterfly. I’m offering this canvas print through Fine Art America, a company renown for their museum-quality prints. Fine Art America has fulfillment centers in the United States, Canada, Europe, Australia, and the United Kingdom. The image is printed on canvas and mounted on a 11×14-1.5-inch stretcher frame–ready to hang on your wall. With proper care this canvas print should retain its beautiful appearance for at least 75 years.

Regular price $131
SALE price $59

This promotion ends on July 31. Click for details.

Black and white photo of a shirtless man wearing butterfly wings.

If these photos don’t suit your fancy, you’ll find a variety of others in my print shop. I’ll offer new Limited Time Promotions next week, so subscribe to my blog at the bottom of this page, or on the Contact page, to receive the announcement.

 

New wholesale product line!

I’m excited to announce a new wholesale product line, which includes press-printed greeting cards, photo cards, and wall art.

This isn’t my first venture into the greeting card business. In the early 2000s, I sold a line of cards and gifts under the business name Trailer Park Creations. The line of humorous political merchandise proved successful, and sold in stores at New York City’s Times Square, along San Francisco’s Castro Street, in the Newbury Comics chain, and in a variety of middle-America card and novelty shops.

Colombia Art

Nature Art

Architecture Art

The new product line focuses on my photography. Since I live in Colombia, and just two blocks from the nearest coffee plantation, I’ve put together a collection of Colombia- and coffee-themed products for cafes and restaurants. But that’s not all. You can find cards and artwork from my Urban Abstract and Material World collections, as well as of architectural, nature, and street photography scenes.

Street Musicians, Salento, Colombia

Traditional Colombian Dresses

Farmer with Poncho, Libano, Colombia

Greeting cards start at $21 for a pack of 25 cards and envelopes, and wall art ranges in price from $40-160. All products are manufactured in and shipped from the United States. I charge just $7 per order for ground shipping.

Until July 31, you can receive a 10% discount by entering coupon code FIRSTORDER at checkout.

Please stop by the Design Store and take a look around. And if you know an interior designer or a gift shop, cafe, or novelty shop owner, please pass along this message to them.

https://www.d76.us/wholesale

 

 

The City Paper Bogotá – July 2017

Big Picture from Colombia: A meeting of mules in Tolima

By The City Paper Staff

Big Picture from Colombia: A meeting of mules in Tolima

Photographer Michael Evans has explored the mist-covered towns of Tolima for seven years since taking a bold decision to settle in this department nestled between the the Magdalena River and coffee growing region of the Central Cordillera. While on one of many trips to the most rugged regions of the altiplano Tolimense, Evans came across Murillo, a town founded in 1872 that preserves a rustic Republican heritage.

As the last municipality before entering the Parque Nacional de los Nevados and craggy folds of the Nevado del Ruíz volcano, Murillo is a small farming community dedicated to cultivating potatoes and tree tomatoes, with no shortage of friendly mules to greet you as you wander this town’s half empty streets… continue reading at The City Paper Bogotá

Let’s talk about prints

I often miss the almost Zen-like atmosphere of the darkroom—the sound of running water, the dim amber glow of the safelight, the ticking of the enlarger timer, the feel of wet photo paper in my hand, even the burning sensation of acetic acid in my nostrils. Most of all, I miss hunching over a tray and marveling at the slow motion appearance of an image, the birth of a photograph.

One of my college photography teachers used to say I snuck up on my prints, meaning I took tiny steps in making my photos. It was true. I’d often end up with a dozen or more prints of the same image, with only slight variations in exposure or contrast. I snuck up on digital photography, too. Skeptical about the technology and unsure if I could produce the same quality of print from a digital original, I first bought a negative scanner and started post-producing everything in Photoshop. Later, I downloaded high-resolution digital photos from the internet and re-edited them in Photoshop. I realized I could match, and in many cases surpass, the quality of image I could produce in a darkroom.

I applied the same scrutiny to my digital printing, seeking out processes and substrates that would mirror black and white silver gelatin prints and offer the highest-quality archival results in both black and white and color images. Since the beginning of my digital career, I’ve outsourced my printing, primarily because it’s not feasible to maintain expensive printing equipment, especially in a technological environment in which hardware advances so quickly. Moving abroad has reinforced that decision.

Nonetheless, I offer two types of open edition prints.

Traditional Prints

Traditional prints involve precut photo paper and a chemical process. I’ve partnered with one of America’s best professional photo labs—a company I’ve used for gallery prints for nearly 12 years—to offer archival traditional prints directly from this website. When ordering traditional prints, you can choose between lustre, deep matte, and metallic finishes, in most cases.

Lustre paper (Kodak Endura Professional) has a smooth surface and a semi-gloss finish. It produces accurate skin tones, vibrant colors, and when used for black and white images simulates the look of silver gelatin paper. If you’re unsure about what type of paper to select, you can’t go wrong by choosing the lustre option.

Deep matte paper (Fuji Crystal Archive Professional) renders beautiful skin tones, produces a soft look in black and white images, and has a smooth surface and non-reflective finish. Deep matte is an excellent choice for color images with medium to low contrast and black and white photos with wide tonal ranges. I particularly like the look of black and white landscape and architectural photos printed on deep matte paper.

Metallic paper (Kodak Endura Professional) produces shiny silver and white tones in black and white images, and an almost reflective appearance to light tones in color photos. I don’t offer metallic paper for all images and it’s a choice you should select carefully, based on the overall look of the photo.

I trust Kodak and Fuji products. All of these papers meet archival standards and produce prints you can display for 100 years or more, when matted with acid-free materials, or place in dark storage for 200 years or more without loss of quality.

When looking at images in the print galleries, you can click the shopping cart or “Buy Photo” icons to launch the ordering module, which will display sizes and papers offered. If you click on the type of paper, a dialogue box will open to display information about the product.

I also offer metal prints. This modern printing method prints the photo directly on a sheet of aluminum. Metal prints come with a ¾-inch deep hanging system that gives the print the appearance of floating from off the wall.

When ordering lustre, deep matte, and metallic prints, you also have the option to mount the print on 3mm styrene or order a standout display. Styrene is an archival plastic material that adds a rigid backing to prints you plan to frame. Styrene mounting protects the print from bending or creasing and provides a permanently attached backing board for matting. Standout prints provide an all-in-one solution that does not require matting or framing. After printing the image, the lab mounts the print to a piece of ¾-inch deep foam and attaches a black plastic border. These lightweight and reasonably priced displays arrive ready to hang.

Black and white photo of a palm tree covered with parasitic plants.
Standout print

In the print galleries, you’ll notice two options with each image, borderless and with a white border. Borderless prints offer edge-to-edge coverage. If you order a 12×18-inch print, the image will take up the entire space. Borders reduce the actual image size by a few inches. For instance, a 12×18-inch print might have a 9×15-inch image printed in the center of the paper. Prints with borders are easier to mat and offer a classic look for standout prints.

Color photo of a green plant with a colorful butterfly on one of its leaves.

Prints ship directly from the U.S. lab, which charges a flat rate $7.25 fee (trackable, 5-10 day service) to ship an unlimited number of prints. You can also choose three- or two-day shipping for an additional fee. Shipping costs for metal prints range from $15-30 each. International shipping rates vary, depending on the destination.

In most cases, all sales are final when you order traditional prints from this website. If your print arrives damaged, please contact me immediately to arrange for a replacement.

Shop for traditional prints.

Giclée Prints

Currently, I offer giclée prints through Fine Art America, which has 14 fulfillment centers in the United States, Canada, Europe, Australia, and the United Kingdom.

Giclée is a French word that means to spurt or spray and refers to an inkjet printing process. But Fine Art America doesn’t use office variety inkjet machines. They use large industrial models that produce museum-quality prints, using archival inks and substrates. These machines print on large rolls of paper several feet/meters wide. Rather than trying to fit a photo onto a standard-sized paper, such as an 11×14-inch, Fine Art America always prints images full frame and adds a 1-inch white border. The border makes it easier for a professional framer to mat and frame the image, but makes it a little more difficult to shop for a premade frame in a standard size.

Fine Art America claims their prints last up to 75 years, with proper care. It’s a standard claim, and one I have no reason to doubt. However, keep in mind that the giclée process has only existed since the 1990s, so we don’t have 75-year-old prints to prove the claim.

In my Fine Art America store, you can choose prints on standard paper, metal, acrylic, and wood. You also have the option of museum- and gallery-wrapped canvas prints, which are printed full frame. That means you won’t lose any of the image in the wrapping process. You can choose black or white borders, or a mirrored look, which copies the edge of the image and repeats it on the canvas border. All canvas prints include hanging wires or brackets and arrive ready to hang on your wall.

Color photo of red and gold marquee at the Flamingo Hotel and Casino in Las Vegas advertising Donny and Marie Osmond show.
Canvas print

Fine Art America also offers custom matting and framing options. The website interface allows you to choose from a wide variety of framing and matting materials and shows you how the final product will look. This is a great option if you don’t have a preferred framer in your area.

Shipping charges vary and range from $6.25 for a single 8×5-inch print, to $26.95 for a 40×26-inch metal print, or $56.95 for a 40×26-inch canvas print shipped to U.S. destinations. I’ve noticed slightly higher shipping costs for Limited Time Promotion prints and multiple-print orders.

I’m not directly involved with orders placed through Fine Art America. If you experience a shipping or printing problem, you must contact Fine Art America directly. They offer a 30-day Satisfaction Guarantee, which you can read about here: https://8-michael-evans.pixels.com/moneybackguaranteeartistwebsites.html

Shop for giclée prints.

Limited Edition Prints

When I lived in San Francisco, I only offered limited edition prints. Since moving abroad, offering limited edition prints has presented a few logistical problems. Currently, I still use photo labs in the United States. That means the lab must ship prints to me in Colombia, where I sign and number them, before shipping them to the buyer. Prints usually arrive 6-8 weeks after you make a purchase. The process will become faster when I find comparable Colombian labs to print my work. Subscribe to this blog to receive announcements about limited edition print offers.

Contact Me

Contact me if you have questions about prints, or have specific print needs not found on this website.

Further Reading

Care, Handling, and Storage of Photographs: http://www.loc.gov/preservation/care/photo.html

Giclee Printing Process – What Artists Need to Know: http://www.agora-gallery.com/advice/blog/2016/07/07/giclee-printing-process-what-artists-need-to-know/

Kodak Endura Professional Paper: http://imaging.kodakalaris.com/product/kodak-professional-endura-premier-paper

Fujicolor Crystal Archive Deep Matte Paper: http://www.fujifilmusa.com/products/photofinishing/paper_lab_products/color_papers_printing_materials/deep_matte/

 

SALE! Limited Time Promotion Ends July 2

Each week I offer up to three Limited Time Promotions, which run for just five days. This week’s Limited Time Promotions include a trio of tropical images to celebrate summer’s arrival. Subscribe to my blog at the bottom of this page, or on the Contact page, so you won’t miss announcements about these special deals. This week’s promotions end July 2.

Limited Time Promotion

This week’s first Limited Time Promotion is a 16×20-inch gallery-wrapped canvas print of Tree of Life, version 2. I’m offering this canvas print through Fine Art America, a company renown for their museum-quality prints. Fine Art America has fulfillment centers in the United States, Canada, Europe, Australia, and the United Kingdom. The image is printed on canvas and mounted on a 16×20-1.5-inch stretcher frame–ready to hang on your wall. With proper care this canvas print should retain its beautiful appearance for at least 75 years.

Regular price $180
SALE price $89

This promotion ends on July 2. Click for details.

Black and white photo of a palm tree, with it trunk covered with parasitic plants.
Regular price $180, sale price $89. Promotion ends July 2.

 

Limited Time Promotion

The second Limited Time Promotion is an 30×40-inch gallery-wrapped canvas print of Two Palms. I’m offering this canvas print through Fine Art America, a company renown for their museum-quality prints. Fine Art America has fulfillment centers in the United States, Canada, Europe, Australia, and the United Kingdom. The image is printed on canvas and mounted on a 30×40-1.5-inch stretcher frame–ready to hang on your wall. With proper care this canvas print should retain its beautiful appearance for at least 75 years.

Regular price $417
SALE price $219

This promotion ends on July 2. Click for details.

Color photograph of two silvery palm trees set against a beautifully weathered mustard yellow stucco wall.
Regular price $417, sale price $219. Promotion ends July 2.

 

Limited Time Promotion

Last, but not least, is a 36×24-inch gallery-wrapped canvas print of Tulum Mayan Ruins. I’m offering this canvas print through Fine Art America, a company renown for their museum-quality prints. Fine Art America has fulfillment centers in the United States, Canada, Europe, Australia, and the United Kingdom. The image is printed on canvas and mounted on a 36×24-1.5-inch stretcher frame–ready to hang on your wall. With proper care this canvas print should retain its beautiful appearance for at least 75 years.

Regular price $359
SALE price $179

This promotion ends on July 2. Click for details.

Color photograph of a beach scene at the Tulum, Mexico ruins site, with a blue sky, blue ocean, and white sand beach.
Regular price $359, sale price $179. Promotion ends July 2.

 

If these photos don’t suit your fancy, you’ll find a variety of others in my print shop. I’ll offer new Limited Time Promotions next week, so subscribe to my blog at the bottom of this page, or on the Contact page, to receive the announcement.

 

SALE! Limited Time Promotion Ends June 18

Each week I offer up to three Limited Time Promotions, which run for just five days. Subscribe to my blog at the bottom of this page, or on the Contact page, so you won’t miss announcements about these special deals. This week’s promotions end June 18.

Limited Time Promotion

This week’s first Limited Time Promotion is a 16×20-inch gallery-wrapped canvas print of He’s Got Dalai Lama Eyes. I’m offering this canvas print through Fine Art America, a company renown for their museum-quality prints. The image is printed on canvas and mounted on a 16×20-1.5-inch stretcher frame–ready to hang on your wall. With proper care this canvas print should retain its beautiful appearance for at least 75 years.

Regular price $123
SALE price $89

This promotion ends on June 18. Click for details.

Black and white photo of the eyes of the Dalai Lama on a billboard.
Promotion ends June 18

 

Limited Time Promotion

The second Limited Time Promotion is an 11×14-inch gallery-wrapped canvas print of Intersection. I’m offering this canvas print through Fine Art America, a company renown for their museum-quality prints. The image is printed on canvas and mounted on a 11×14-1.5-inch stretcher frame–ready to hang on your wall. With proper care this canvas print should retain its beautiful appearance for at least 75 years.

Regular price $87
SALE price $59

This promotion ends on June 18. Click for details.

Black and white photo irst photo is of mannequins in a store window.
Promotion ends June 18

 

Limited Time Promotion

Last, but not least, is a 36×24-inch gallery-wrapped canvas print of Street Musicians in Salento, Colombia. I’m offering this canvas print through Fine Art America, a company renown for their museum-quality prints. The image is printed on canvas and mounted on a 36×24-1.5-inch stretcher frame–ready to hang on your wall. With proper care this canvas print should retain its beautiful appearance for at least 75 years.

Regular price $252
SALE price $179

This promotion ends on June 18. Click for details.

Color photo of Colombian street musicians in front of a colonial house.
Promotion ends June 18

 

If these photos don’t suit your fancy, you’ll find a variety of others in my print shop. I’ll offer new Limited Time Promotions next week, so subscribe to my blog at the bottom of this page, or on the Contact page, to receive the announcement.

Backstory: The Believer

Black and white photograph of an elderly African American woman sitting on a cluttered porch, holding up a Bible in her left hand and holding up her right hand as if testifying.
The Believer

 

The most successful photographs usually have an important backstory. The making of this photo, The Believer, played a significant role in my evolution as a photographer.

In the documentary film Everybody Street, the late photographer Mary Ellen Mark said, “Often, your subject matter can show you what the picture is. I’m not a strong believer in heavy-duty concepts when I do portraits of people. I try to make iconic images. That’s my goal, to make images that stand on their own. Still pictures should be single, very powerful images.”

In our digital world, that’s a message seasoned photographers must constantly remember and new photographers must learn. Today, we shoot, edit, publish. We post here, there, and everywhere—Flickr, Instagram, Facebook, Twitter, Pinterest. Getting noticed has become a numbers game. We must constantly inject our work into the world, or perish, resulting in a glut of mediocre photos that we contribute to and sift through when viewing other people’s pictures. Perhaps we need to slow down, to wait.

In the early 1990s, I worked as a photographer for the Shelby County Government in Memphis, Tennessee. I was the only photographer, shooting everything from grip-and-grin photos to architectural and documentary shots for publications. On a typical day, I might take a photo of the mayor presenting a proclamation, then go to the county hospital to shoot in the newborn center, and later follow a visiting dignitary promoting a pet project.

One summer afternoon, my boss asked me to shadow a social worker, Kay, to take photos for a newsletter story about a heat intervention program that provided free portable fans. Heat was a serious health risk during summer months, because many impoverished Memphians didn’t have air conditioning, and some couldn’t afford to buy a fan to stay cool. During July and August, when temperatures would rise above 100° F (38° C), heat-related deaths would skyrocket.

That afternoon was a scorcher. When I arrived at Kay’s office, she said she knew exactly who I should photograph—a client of hers, an elderly woman who needed relief from the heat in the worst possible way. A lady I will always remember as The Believer.

When we arrived at the lady’s home, we found her sitting on the front porch. She wore a turban-like head covering, cheap canvas shoes, and the type of smock often worn by childcare workers or lunchroom attendants. A set of tarnished keys dangled from a cord around her neck, as she sat like the lady of the manor amongst an eclectic collection of stuff—an empty Gatorade bottle, a pair of antique wooden theater seats, an old football helmet, and an impressive collection of five-gallon buckets.

“Praise the Lord,” the woman said, as Kay walked to the front porch carrying the fan. “I’ve been praying and praying and I knew the good Lord would provide. I’m a believer!” Tears streamed down her face as she hugged Kay, and then me, and I found myself filled with a mix of emotions, from joy to sadness.

Stepping onto the front porch, I peered in the front door of her house and felt shocked by what I saw. She was a hoarder—the type that has to create paths from one room to another to navigate through floor-to-ceiling newspapers, furniture, books, and rubbish. She never opened the windows, fearing burglars, but most were inaccessible anyway, blocked by piles of junk. Once she shut the door, no fresh air could circulate in the house. I wondered how she had avoided dying from heatstroke. And if a fire had started inside the structure, she would have had virtually no way to escape.

I had the urge to pull out my camera and start shooting everything in sight, but my instincts told me to wait. I felt an immediate fondness for the lady. She had a strength of character that only poverty can create and it was clear she really did believe in something—some sort of deliverance, great or small, something that would rescue her from her plight. Hers was the type of belief I’d seen so often in Memphis’ poor neighborhoods, one that comforted her in the harsh reality of her condition.

As her tears dried, a smile filled her face. We sat and chatted for a while, Kay encouraging her to declutter her house, and I just listening, getting to know her. I imaged her as a pillar of the community and a fixture of the neighborhood, someone generations of children grew up knowing and loving. I envisioned her handing out homemade popsicles or calming a child who had fallen off of his bicycle.

When the time came for Kay and me to leave, I asked the lady if I could take a photo of her with her new fan. “Of course,” she replied, but then she asked if she could have her Bible in the photo. “Yes, ma’am,” I said. At first, she placed the Bible in her lap, her legs extended in a relaxed position. Click. That’s perfect for the news story, I thought. Then she opened the Bible, holding it in her left hand, while raising her right hand, as if testifying. Click! That one’s for me, I thought. I felt a wave of excitement, knowing the lady had just given me a portfolio piece, an image I would showcase and cherish for the rest of my life.

I rushed to the darkroom, knowing I had taken the type of iconic picture that had drawn me to photography in the first place. I spent hours in the darkroom perfecting the image—burning and dodging and setting up multiple trays of various developers to produce the best tonality. Years later, I would tweak and re-tweak the picture in Photoshop, always feeling the same affection for the lady and the image.

The Believer became one of a handful of iconic images I’ve taken in my career. In the end, one can only hope for a small collection of truly good photographs, even throughout a long career. Creating the picture taught me the value of my instincts; the ability to read a subject and situation and the knowledge that, when photographing people, respecting the dignity of a person and waiting for the right moment can produce the best results. And on rare occasions, your subject will give you a gift.

NOTE: Subscribe to my blog at the bottom of this page to receive announcements about future stories.

Instagram photo of the day: Simon Bolivar statue in Salento, Colombia

New book – My Colombia: The First Seven Years

I’m pleased to announce my new photobook, My Colombia: The First Seven Years. The book contains 67 photos I’ve taken while living and working in Colombia. It is available in hardcover, soft cover, and PDF editions.

Preview and buy My Colombia: The First Seven Years at Blurb.

See a selection of photos from My Colombia: The First Seven Years in the Galleries section.